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Week 10 Using Technology to Differentiate the Product #diffimooc

April 2, 2013

This week we were to think of ways we can use technology to differentiate the product in our classroom.

We were to start with the standards, identify standards we wanted to focus on, create a rubric and be thinking about a product.

I started by reading the AK Math Standards for my grade level (1st). Next I pulled out all the standards that looked applicable to my project ideas. Once I finally settled on one idea, I narrowed the standards further.  I also tried to choose standards that would work well together. I wanted my students to be able to make some connections.

I decided that I wanted to do something that would help students connect the fractions of ½ and ¼ to their everyday lives. I saw some connections with the time and money standards. Time and money are also things that students need continued practice with, especially identifying equivalent values. Although most of my students can draw partition a shape into halves and fourths, they could use some practice using the vocabulary. Sometimes I think students memorize what ½ and ¼ look like just as they learn to identify a square or triangle. They can identify it, but they are not sure about the attributes.

If students could work together to create examples of ½ and ¼ I think they could learn a great deal from each other and their efforts would go a long way toward developing a deeper understanding of the concepts. I am thinking that small groups could create a VoiceThread or a ShowMe video to share with others. They could contribute to the projects in ways they felt most comfortable such as writing, drawing, speaking, building a model, or taking pictures. I will need to assist them with the technology, but I have a feeling the technology will be a motivator for them.

I have talked with another teacher in my PLN about sharing the videos each of our classes create. In this way, the students can learn from students in classrooms outside their own community.

What follows is a description of the process I went through in creating a rubric for this week.

NETS-T

d. Provide students with multiple and varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use resulting data to inform learning and teaching

 

Some of the standards I pulled:

 

1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

  • focus on the problem and check for alternate methods
  • check if the solution makes sense

4. Model with mathematics.

In grades K-2 mathematically proficient students will:

  • apply mathematics to solve problems in everyday life
  • identify important quantities in a practical situation and model the situation with manipulatives or pictures

6. Attend to precision.

In grades K-2 mathematically proficient students will:

  • give thoughtful explanations to each other
  • use clear definitions and reasoning in discussion with others
  • state the meaning of symbols they choose, including using the equal sign consistently and appropriately
  • Work with time and money.
  • 1.MD.3. Tell and write time in half hours using both analog and digital clocks.
  • 1.MD.5. Recognize and read money symbols including $ and ¢.
  • 1.MD.6. Identify values of coins (e.g., nickel = 5 cents, quarter = 25 cents). Identify equivalent values of coins up to $1 (e.g., 5 pennies = 1 nickel, 5 nickels = 1 quarter).
  • Geometry.
  • 1.G.3. Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares.  Describe the shares using the words, halves, fourths, and quarters and phrases half of, fourth of and quarter of. Describe the whole as two of or four of the shares. Understand for these examples that decomposing (break apart) into more equal shares creates smaller shares.

AK Speaking and Listening Standards K-5

1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).

b. Build on others’ talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges.

c. Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion

2. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.

5. Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.

The next step was to “unpack” the standards. What will a student need to be able to do in order to be successful? So, as I read through the standards, I tried to condense the language into a format that would lend itself to making a rubric.

Students will be able to:

Solve problems:

  • solve problems related to everyday life
  • focus on a problem and check for alternate methods using models, pictures or symbols
  • check to see if the solution makes sense
  • use clear and thoughtful explanations during discussions, including definitions for the symbols used

Work with time and money:

  • tell time to the half hour
  • recognize $ and cents symbols
  • Identify values of coins and equivalent values up to $1.00.

Geometry:

  • Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares.
  • Describe shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, one half of, one fourth of, and one quarter of.
  • Describe the whole as two of or four of the shares.
  • Understand decomposition – breaking the whole into more equal shares means smaller shares.

Use appropriate listening and speaking skills:

  • Participate in collaborative group discussions:

–       follow agreed upon rules

–       build on others talk by making and responding to comments

–       asking questions to clarify understanding

  • ask questions about key points or details presented orally or other form of media
  • add drawing or other visuals to description to clarify ideas

Next, I came up with some possible questions I might pose to a group of students.

Possible questions:

How could you explain the meaning of ½ and 1/4th?

Can you think of some ways people use ½ and ¼ in everyday life?

Using examples from everyday life like time and money, how many different ways could you show ½ and 1/4th?

From here it was fairly easy to develop the rubric. The hardest part was deciding which standards to focus on.

4 – Exceeds Expectations 3 – Proficient 2 – Learning in Progress 1- Needs more time and help
Time Tells time to the quarter hour on both digital and analog clock Tells time to the half hour on digital and analog clock. Tells time to the hour, inconsistent with half hour. Inconsistent with both hour and half hour.
Money Identifies values of coins and equivalent values greater than $1.00. Uses the cent and $ symbol correctly and consistently. Identifies coin values and equivalent values up to $1.00. Identifies the values of coins, but not consistently. Identifies some equivalent coin values up to $1.00. Unsure of the coins and their values.
Geometry Understands and uses fractions other than ¼ and ½. Partitions circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares. Uses appropriate vocabulary to describe shares and understands decomposition. Can identify ½ and ¼, but not able to explain what they mean.  Does not use correct vocabulary. Not able to distinguish between ½ and ¼.
Problem Solving Solves problems using a variety of methods. Uses a wide variety of examples, with exceptionally clear and descriptive explanations. Solves problems using examples from everyday life, clear explanations, pictures, models, and appropriate symbols. Checks to see if solution makes sense. May be able to work through the problem, but description is not clear. Cannot explain how they arrived at the solution or why they think it is correct. Unable to explain the process for solving a problem. Solutions are often incorrect.
Listening & Speaking Follows rules, contributes, comments and encourages others to contribute. Follows rules for group discussion. Contributes to conversation and comments on other’s ideas. Needs to be reminded of the rules for conversation. Contributes to the conversation when prompted Did not contribute to the group discussion.
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